Sunday, December 4, 2016

Zero Cholesterol Wild Mushroom Soup

July 4, 2008 by  
Filed under Recipe Submissions

Ingredients

3 1/2 cups organic vegetable broth
1 1/2-ounce package dried porcini mushrooms*

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 1/2 cups chopped onions
12 ounces assorted wild mushrooms (such as crimini and stemmed shiitake), sliced
8 ounces button mushrooms, sliced
3 garlic cloves, minced
4 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme or 1 1/2 teaspoons dried
4 teaspoons all purpose flour
2 cups soy milk
1/4 cup of cooking sherry (optional)

Preparation

Bring broth to boil in medium saucepan. Remove from heat. Add porcini mushrooms to saucepan; let soak until mushrooms soften, about 20 minutes. Drain, reserving broth but discarding any sediment in broth. Coarsely chop porcini mushrooms.

Heat olive oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add chopped onions and sauté until tender, about 7 minutes. Add wild mushrooms and button mushrooms and sauté until brown and tender, about 8 minutes. Add minced garlic, thyme, and porcini and sauté 2 minutes. Sprinkle flour over; stir 1 minute. Gradually whisk in reserved porcini soaking liquid and soy milk. Bring to boil, stirring frequently. Reduce heat to medium and boil gently until soup thickens slightly, about 12 minutes. Transfer 1 1/2 cups soup to blender and puree until smooth. Return to pot. Bring soup to simmer. Season soup to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into bowls and serve. Servings: Makes 4 servings

* Dried porcini mushrooms are sold at Italian markets, Trader Joe’s, specialty foods stores and many supermarkets.

Article Source

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Diigo
  • email
  • PDF
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks

Comments

One Response to “Zero Cholesterol Wild Mushroom Soup”
  1. Dave Pate says:

    For Your Information:

    Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1984 May 31;121(1):168-73.

    Stimulation of sphingomyelin hydrolysis by cannabidiol in fibroblasts from a Niemann-Pick patient.

    Burstein S, Hunter SA, Renzulli L.

    Abstract

    The hydrolysis of sphingomyelin in cells derived from a Niemann-Pick patient was studied using both a labelled precursor and measurement of endogenous levels. In vitro exposure of the cells to cannabidiol resulted in a large decrease in both the relative and absolute amounts of this lipid; the drug had a smaller effect on normal fibroblasts. Cannabidiol has been tested in the clinic as an antiepileptic agent with some success; our findings suggest that it may also be useful in relieving the symptoms associated with Niemann-Pick disease.

Speak Your Mind

Tell us what you're thinking...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!

CommentLuv Enabled